Pop Connections

Jun 26
Jun 26
emmyc:


ok

emmyc:

ok

Jun 26

fishingboatproceeds:

hollyblack:

“When you are a woman or a girl or female no one says to you Look, artists who are great take without asking and take and take and do not apologize because when you are a woman or a girl or female the only thing you are supposed to take is a lot of other people’s shit. No one says to you Be sure you are strong enough to take and not apologize and keep going when the taking leaves you nothing to go back to. Be sure you are strong enough to steal and live alone with what you’ve chosen to make yours.”

—The Rejectionist, “What I Did the Summer I Graduated” (via novaren)

Take and take and take and do not apologize!

Jun 26
lovequotesrus:

Photo Courtesy: kurthalseylovers

lovequotesrus:

Photo Courtesy: kurthalseylovers

Jun 26

quote When I am silent, I have thunder hidden inside.

— Rumi  (via youngfolksociety)
Jun 15

tyleroakley:

nextyearsgirl:

The laws in the Old Testament were set forth by God as the rules the Hebrews needed to follow in order to be righteous, to atone for the sin of Adam and Eve and to be able to get into Heaven. That is also why they were required to make sacrifices, because it was part of the appeasement for Original Sin.

According to Christian theology, when Jesus came from Heaven, it was for the express purpose of sacrificing himself on the cross so that our sins may be forgiven. His sacrifice was supposed to be the ultimate act that would free us from the former laws and regulations and allow us to enter Heaven by acting in his image. That is why he said “it is finished” when he died on the cross. That is why Christians don’t have to circumcise their sons (God’s covenant with Jacob), that is why they don’t have to perform animal sacrifice, or grow out their forelocks, or follow any of the other laws of Leviticus.

When you quote Leviticus as God’s law and say they are rules we must follow because they are what God or Jesus wants us to do, what you are really saying, as a Christian, is that Christ’s sacrifice on the cross was invalid. He died in vain because you believe we are still beholden to the old laws. That is what you, a self-professed good Christian, are saying to your God and his son, that their plan for your salvation wasn’t good enough for you.

So maybe actually read the thing before you start quoting it, because the implications of your actions go a lot deeper than you think.

-An atheist who understands Christian theology better than Bible-thumpers do.

May 29
Mar 16

my cells remember the beginning

of it all.

(frankocean)

Mar 16
Mar 11

On The “Sorry”

sadybusiness:

Before I was a writer, I only had one really annoying trait. Well, I mean. I’ve always had flaws. I’m bad at picking up subtleties. I don’t have a conversational filter. I can’t back down from a fight, I whine, I obsess, I hold grudges, etc. All of this has always been true. 

But before I wrote, I had only one trait that everyone who knew me complained about. People who disliked me, people who liked me: Everyone asked me to stop, at a certain point. Every single time I spoke, I said the word “sorry.” 

Sorry, I’m not in the mood to go out tonight. Sorry, I think the mustard is on the other shelf. I really hope Bush doesn’t get re-elected, sorry. Your shirt is really nice, sorry if that’s weird to say. Sorry. It was constant. I felt that everything I said had to be prefaced or concluded with an apology for speaking. This is a gender thing: Women do this, lots of women do this, and I was one of them; my therapist eventually told me that I only got one use of the word “sorry” per session, and he would cut me off mid-word if I did it more than once, which I always did. 

So, after a few years with that therapist, I lost the habit, and I became much more articulate. Once I wasn’t paralyzed with self-consciousness, and tripping over my words, I started to seem more intelligent, and people started to tell me that I was funny, and smart, and pretty good with words, and I should write, because what was the worst that could happen? 

After a year and a half of writing, the “sorry” started again.

Read More